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148 notes

world-shaker:

 It’s Official: Using Twitter Makes Students More Engaged

Further affirming what you probably already know, Twitter is evidently one of the best tools for learning and becoming an engaged student. We’ve covered the benefits of the social network ad nauseum for teachers and administrators over the past few years … but a new study solidifies the worth of Twitter for students.
Assistant Professor of Education at Michigan State University, Christine Greenhow, conducted a study titled “Twitteracy: Tweeting is a New Literary Practice.” In it, she found that college students who tweet as part of their instruction are more engaged with the course content, the teacher, other students, and they have higher grades.

world-shaker:

It’s Official: Using Twitter Makes Students More Engaged

Further affirming what you probably already know, Twitter is evidently one of the best tools for learning and becoming an engaged student. We’ve covered the benefits of the social network ad nauseum for teachers and administrators over the past few years … but a new study solidifies the worth of Twitter for students.

Assistant Professor of Education at Michigan State University, Christine Greenhow, conducted a study titled “Twitteracy: Tweeting is a New Literary Practice.” In it, she found that college students who tweet as part of their instruction are more engaged with the course content, the teacher, other students, and they have higher grades.

(via world-shaker-deactivated2013092)

36 notes

adiemtocarpe:

Welcome to Ted Ed!
My school just started using this awesome website. Essentially, lessons are taught through videos. An educator and an animator team up to create a video full of awesome. Students watch and answer questions and are given additional resources to use.
The amazing part is an educator can “flip” the video - customizing the questions and content to meet the needs of his or her students. And the SUPER amazing part? You can create your own lessons with ANY video on YouTube (and YouTube for Schools if your school has YouTube blocked). Yes, you can take an educational video from you-tube, and create a site for your students to visit and complete a lesson on.
Rad.

adiemtocarpe:

Welcome to Ted Ed!

My school just started using this awesome website. Essentially, lessons are taught through videos. An educator and an animator team up to create a video full of awesome. Students watch and answer questions and are given additional resources to use.

The amazing part is an educator can “flip” the video - customizing the questions and content to meet the needs of his or her students. And the SUPER amazing part? You can create your own lessons with ANY video on YouTube (and YouTube for Schools if your school has YouTube blocked). Yes, you can take an educational video from you-tube, and create a site for your students to visit and complete a lesson on.

Rad.

37 notes

Seven Keys to Effective Feedback

world-shaker:

It’s easy to overlook the importance of some resources, so I really want to point something out:

This article was written by one of the pioneers of Backwards Design. It’s outstanding, and I strongly recommend a read (maybe over lunch so you can spend some meaningful time with it).

Here’s one of the seven keys:

Goal-Referenced

Effective feedback requires that a person has a goal, takes action to achieve the goal, and receives goal-related information about his or her actions. I told a joke—why? To make people laugh. I wrote a story to engage the reader with vivid language and believable dialogue that captures the characters’ feelings. I went up to bat to get a hit. If I am not clear on my goals or if I fail to pay attention to them, I cannot get helpful feedback (nor am I likely to achieve my goals).

Information becomes feedback if, and only if, I am trying to cause something and the information tells me whether I am on track or need to change course. If some joke or aspect of my writing isn’t working—a revealing, nonjudgmental phrase—I need to know.

Note that in everyday situations, goals are often implicit, although fairly obvious to everyone. I don’t need to announce when telling the joke that my aim is to make you laugh. But in school, learners are often unclear about the specific goal of a task or lesson, so it is crucial to remind them about the goal and the criteria by which they should self-assess. For example, a teacher might say,

  • The point of this writing task is for you to make readers laugh. So, when rereading your draft or getting feedback from peers, ask, How funny is this? Where might it be funnier?
  • As you prepare a table poster to display the findings of your science project, remember that the aim is to interest people in your work as well as to describe the facts you discovered through your experiment. Self-assess your work against those two criteria using these rubrics. The science fair judges will do likewise.

(via world-shaker-deactivated2013092)

14 notes

Timelines

diaryofafyt:

A colleague shared the Timetoast website with me today. It’s free and allows you to create timelines and share them on the web. I plan to use this resource when I have students trace their own roots for a project on immigration and emigration early next year.

(Source: jibteaches)